Archive for the ‘Pictures’ Category

Commercial/Real-Estate Photography

Saturday, May 28th, 2011

For real estate, commercial, and architectural photography, you want to start with a high quality wide angle lens. You may also need a camera that is capable of doing high ISO, and you may need to supplement the environment with additional lighting.

Although you can certainly take and present decent straight-out-of-the-camera photographs for a client, but you will most likely get a better product by using professional post-processing techniques via Photoshop and various plug-in filters.

Here’s a recent photograph taken for a client. Here’s the “before” picture. Click on the image to see it close-up.

Before Processing

 

Although it’s a perfectly fine image, you’ll see after we touch up the lens flare, add some sharpness and detail to the image, and colour correct the photo, I think you’ll agree that the photograph stands out more. Click on the image to see it close-up.

After Processing

 

 

Here’s a summary of what was done in this example:

  • Cleaned up lens flare in Photoshop
  • Reduced noise in Lightroom
  • Added detail and sharpness in Photoshop
  • Corrected white balance in Lightroom
  • Removed television images (95% removal) in Photoshop

Reminder

Sunday, February 7th, 2010



"Love and money" (38/365)

Originally uploaded by Tukay Canuck

Just a friendly reminder that Valentine’s day is just around the corner.

Best Regards,
Steve

Panorama How To

Saturday, December 12th, 2009


Champlain Lookout Pano

Originally uploaded by Tukay Canuck

A panorama can be a cool effect for landscape portraits. Panoramas are much easier to do these days with digital cameras.
You don’t have to buy a special panorama camera, or do anything too complicated. There are some basic steps to get a good panorama though.
Here are some tips on how to get a panorama.

1) Use a tripod. This is more of a rule than a tip – don’t even try to build a panorama by hand holding the camera.
Put the camera on a tripod. If your tripod has levels (like the ones used for carpentry), you should use them to make sure your tripod (camera) is level.

2) Put your camera in portrait orientation. This means sideways (normal orientation is called “landscape”). Your tripod should allow this. If not, you should probably invest in a better tripod.

3) Take an exposure reading. You can do this by putting your camera in (A)perture priority, setting it to a high F-stop number (like F22), and pressing the shutter release button down halfway, if you’re using an SLR (or most point and shoot models). The camera will give you an aperture reading and a shutter speed reading.

4) Put your camera in (M)anual mode, and dial in the settings from the previous step. The reason you are doing this is because you will be taking multiple shots, and your camera might have different readings depending
on how bright the sky is or ground is in different places. You don’t want to have different exposures if you are stitching them together – it will look weird. Otherwise, you will be spending a lot of time in post processing
matching the brightness of each picture. You also want to ensure you use the same aperture across all pictures, otherwise things could be blurry in some pictures, but in focus in the next. This will
also make the stitching look weird.

5) Take a picture of your hand or something, indicating the start of your series.

6) Now start shooting. Take a picture, rotate the tripod a bit, take another. You should use a remote, or the timer on the camera, to ensure no camera shake. This will also let you use a longer exposure if it’s getting dark out.
(You probably want to shoot in a higher f-stop number, like f11 -> f22. This will put more of the foreground/background in focus. Since you are shooting on a tripod with a remote or a timer, you don’t need to worry about camera shake)
The more pictures you take, the smoother the stitching will be. (i.e. smaller rotational increments). e.g. 8-15 pictures for a 180 degree view.

7) Mark your last picture with your hand or something, to indicate the end of the series. This will make it easier when you are reviewing your pictures on the computer to see which photos are a part of your pano.

8 ) Use stitching software, like Hugin: http://hugin.sourceforge.net/download/

9) You’re done! Post the picture so others can enjoy.

Headshot

Friday, November 6th, 2009



Headshot

Originally uploaded by Tukay Canuck

This was a shot from a series of action pictures. Follow this link to the set on Flickr!

Vitamins

Sunday, November 1st, 2009



Vitamins

Originally uploaded by Tukay Canuck

You knew that apples contained Vitamin C, but I’ll bet you didn’t know some apples contain iron. Namely blood apples. Happy Hallowe’en!

Happy Hallowe’en!!

Sunday, November 1st, 2009



halloween_20088

Originally uploaded by Tukay Canuck

Here’s a self portrait. I don’t think it’s very flattering, do you?